Memories of a Momentous Time: 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday & The Role of Religious Sister Nurses During The Civil Rights Movement

Sisters of St. Joseph of Rochester with Martin Luther King Jr.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Rochester with Martin Luther King Jr. Image courtesy of the SSJ Archives. All Rights Reserved.

Originally published in Blessings newsletter of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Rochester. Republished with permission

March 7, 1965, was a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement: the day known as Bloody Sunday when peaceful demonstrators marching from Selma to Montgomery were viciously assaulted by local police and Alabama state troopers. The injured were taken to Good Samaritan Hospital where the Sisters of St. Joseph were called to extraordinary service.  Not only Sisters who were nurses, but also those who taught at St. Elizabeth’s School hurried from the convent to assist the victims. (The Sisters of St. Joseph of Rochester who staffed the hospital and school had been serving in Selma since 1940.)

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Life, liberty, and the right to infect others with measles: Rand Paul on vaccination

Rand Paul

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky tried to merge his medical training and libertarian philosophy last week. It was tough. (John Locher/AP)

By Jeffrey P. Baker, MD, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics, Duke University

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky confirmed his membership in the “doctors who shouldn’t have gone into politics” club with his comments last week supporting the right of parents who don’t want their kids to be immunized. While acknowledging vaccines to be “one of the greatest medical breakthroughs that we have,” Paul asserted that they should be voluntary. He talked of “walking, talking, normal kids” who had been left with “profound mental disorders” after getting several vaccines at once, and admitted that he had used an alternative schedule for his own children.

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House Hunters: Historical Edition

Originally posted on Gossiping about Dead People. Reposted with permission of the author.

John and Bridget O’Donnell are fresh off the boat at Ellis Island. These newcomers are looking for a cramped tenement apartment in Manhattan’s hip Lower East Side, where their already large family can continue to grow. Their wish list includes: enough space for a separate mattress for their children; a spot for a chair in the kitchen, where Bridget can pursue her part-time contract seamstress job at home; and a local pub, so John can indulge in a pint with his fellow unskilled laborers after a hard day at the factory.

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