100 Years in Nursing History- Exhibit and Open House!

100 Years in Nursing

Today, over 3 million professional registered nurses deliver essential services and power our nation’s complex health care system. Their work, critical to the smooth functioning of society, often goes unacknowledged and invisible to the public. Nursing’s history is even less well known. Yet, it’s a history worth knowing providing a fascinating look at how the US devised the reliable nursing workforce on which the country depends today.

In the spirit of Archives Month this October, the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing is showcasing 100 Years in Nursing History. Images from the Center’s world-renown collections will be on display as well as other materials covering a century’s worth of nursing history. From training schools to war service to Nurse Practitioners,come learn how nursing has evolved and expanded throughout time, society, and health care.

Join us Oct 12th from 5-7pm for our Open House along with a weeklong special display of artifacts from our nursing collections. The Open House and the exhibit throughout the month is FREE to anyone and refreshments and food will be served. So please, stop in and view our wonderful collection of art and artifacts on the 12th.

Exhibit100 Years in Nursing History, curated by Tiffany Hope Collier and Jessica Clark. Ongoing Monday-Friday 10am – 4pm through Oct 30.

Special Display: Oct 12-16, Open House Oct 12, 5-7pm

Location: Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing. Floor 2U in Claire Fagin Hall.

RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bates-center-open-house-tickets-18263171638 

Special Event: The US Response to Throwaway Children

field center for children's policy, practice, and research

 

 

The U.S. Response to Throwaway Children:
From Orphan Trains to the Current Migrant Crisis

The United States has historically faced the challenge of responding to the needs of children without parents to provide for their care. The Orphan Train provides a historical context for today’s social, moral and legal crisis created by large numbers of unaccompanied migrant children arriving at our borders.

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