Ferguson: A Tale of Health Disparities

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” Martin Luther King Jr.

By Elisa Stroh, Tiffany Hope Collier, and Julie Fairman

With the recent grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown,  Ferguson is again in the news. The protests and aftermath of the death of Brown have stimulated heated debates on civil rights, police brutality, and segregation/racism within Ferguson and the nation as a whole. Continue reading

Recap from Professionalizing Nursing and Medicine: The Early Years Colloquium

(left to right) Jeffrey Brosco, Amanda Mahoney, Steven Peitzman, Patricia D'Antonio, Barron Lerner, and Jean Whelan, gather during recent colloquium (photo credit: Daniel Burke)

(left to right) Jeffrey Brosco, Amanda L. Mahoney, Steven Peitzman, Patricia D’Antonio, Barron Lerner, and Jean Whelan, gather during recent colloquial (photo credit: Daniel Burke)

The Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing held the first Enduring Issues in American Health Care colloquial, Professionalizing Nursing and Medicine: The Early Years on Saturday, September 27th at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Continue reading

Echoes and Evidence: An Introduction

Echoes and Evidence

By Jean C. Whelan, PhD, RN and Julie A. Sochalski, PhD, RN, FAAN

Welcome to Echoes and Evidence, a new blog from the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing that brings hidden treasures from nursing and health care’s rich history and their policy implications to the public arena. Echoes and Evidence delves into the instrumental place that nurses and the nursing profession hold within the wide scope of health care history and health policy.

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